Melia

Origin: Greek, English, Gaelic, Georgian

Μελια (Greek)

Meaning: a derivative of meli meaning “honey” as well as being the word for “ash tree”.

It could also be a diminutive of Amelia, a variant of Amalia from Germanic element amal meaning “work, labor”.

I’ve also seen Melia listed as a surname of Gaelic origins, from O’Maille/O’Maele, referring to male descendants of noblemen from mal meaning “prince” or “champion”.

It also seems to be a Georgian surname believed to be derived from melia or mela meaning “fox”.

Melia is the name of a nymph in Greek mythology, daughter of the Greek god Okeanos, as well as the name of a group of nymphs known as the Meliae, who also happened to be nymphs of the ash tree. They sprang up from the blood of Uranus’s castration.

Camilla

Origin: Latin, Etruscan

Meaning: feminine form of Latin Camillus, a term referring to an acolyte, a youth employed in rituals and sacrifice of ancient Roman religion.

Camilla is also the name of a warrior in the Aenead, whose name likely comes from Etruscan origin of unknown meaning. In the Aenead, Camilla was a member of the Volsci and daughter of King Metabus and his wife Casmilla (of whom she was likely named after). When Metabus was overthrown he fled with his infant daughter. When he got to the river Amasenus he tied baby Camilla to a spear, prayed to the goddess Diana (Artemis’s Greek counterpart) and promised her his daughter’s servitude and virginity if she made it safely across, which she did. When Camilla grew up she was a great warrior, and so swift she could run across water without getting her feet wet. She also sided against Aeneas and the Trojans but was killed in battle.

Variants: Camille (French, unisex); Kamilla, Kamila, Camillus (Ancient Roman), Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)

Sidon

Origin: Greek, Hebrew

Meaning: Sidon was the name of a chief city in ancient Phoenicia (now known as Saida, in Lebanon) which was founded in the 3rd millennium BC, a place famous for its purple dye. The name most likely comes from Phoenician Tzidhon  “fishing place” or “fishery” from tzud (to hunt, capture) though there also seems to be some Hebrew roots as well.

Sidon is also mentioned in the Bible as the son of Canaan, son of Ham, son of Noah.

Variants: Sidonian

It’s pronounced sy-don.

 

Links:

http://www.abarim-publications.com/Meaning/Sidon.html#.VuBpeceVfww

http://www.ancient.eu/sidon/

 

Howard

Origin: English

Meaning: an English surname derived from several possible sources: it could be from Anglo-Norman Huard, from Germanic Hughard meaning “heart, mind + brave, hard” from Germanic elements hug (heart, mind) and hard (brave, hardy).

It could be from Anglo-Scandanavian Haward, from Old Norse Hávarðr meaning “high + guardian, defender” from Old Norse elements há (high) and varðr (guardian, defender).

It could also be an old Middle English term ewehirde meaning “ewe herder”

Diminutive forms of the name are Howie/Howey and Ward.

Vivaldi

Origin: Germanic, Latin, Italian

Meaning: it could be a Latin form of Vivaldus meaning “power, strength in combat” from Old German elements wig (fight, battle, warrior) and walda (might, power).

I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Latin vita meaning “life”.

Vivaldi is an Italian surname, most famously worn by Antonio Lucio Vivaldi, a Baroque composer whose best known work are The Four Seasons, a four violin concerti.

Vanessa

Origin: English

Meaning: a famous name created by the author Jonathan Swift for his poem Cadenus and Vanessa (1713). He created it by taking the first three letters of his lover’s surname (Esther Vanhomrigh) and adding the pet form Essa. Vanhomrigh is a Dutch surname and van means “from”, referring to a habitational surname, while Esther either means “star” or is from Ishtar, of unknown meaning, so I guess you could stretch the meaning to be “from the stars”.

Variant: Vanesa (Czech, Slovak), Vinessa

Amberly

Origin: English

Meaning: an elaboration of Amber influenced by Kimberly. Amber is from Arabic ‘anbar(عنبر), referring fossilized tree resin, while the -lee or -ley ending is from Old English meaning “clearing” or “grove”.

However, it also has a long history as a surname. Although the origins are unclear, from what I could find it could be an occupational name for someone employed as an enameller (from Anglo-Norman-French amayler), someone who applies color or varnish to ceramics.

Amberly could also be derived from Old English ambler meaning “to walk slowly” and is usually used to describe the easy gait ofa horse, referring to someone who was employed with horses.

Technically speaking, amber is not an actual gemstone but fossilized tree resin.

Variants: Amberley, Amberleigh, Amberle, Ambler, Ambeller, Amble

Boston

Origin: English

Meaning: the name of the capital in Massachusetts, named after a town in Lincolnshire, England, meaning “Botulf’s settlement” or “Botulf’s stone”. It was either named after a saint who might have built a monastary around the area in the 7th century, or a landowner who happened to have the same name.

Boston could also be an altered spelling of German Basten, from Bastien, a short form of Sebastian meaning “from Sebaste”.

March

Origin: Latin, Welsh,  English

Meaning: from Latin Martius, named after the Roman god of wars Mars, whose name comes from Latin mas meaning “male” or “manly”.

I’ve also seen it listed as a Welsh form of Mark (pronounced the same) which also comes from Mars.

As well as being the third month of the year, march is also a word, referring to the act of marching, to walk in a measured and deliberate manner.

March also comes from Old French marche meaning “boundary”, referring to a tract of land along a border of a country. In Britian, the Marches refer to a belt of land on the boundary with Wales.

Paden

Origin: Irish, Scottish, English

Meaning: I’ve seen it described as a modern invention using the popular aden suffix but it also has a long history as a surname as well. It could be an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Páidín meaning “son of Páidín”, Páidín being a pet form of Pádraig/Patrick (Patrician/nobleman).

It could also be a variant spelling of Patton, also a surname which is either a short form of Patrick + the diminutive suffix -in meaning “little Pat” or “son of Pat”; or it could be from Middle English pate meaning “head” or “skull” referring to someone who was either bald or had cropped hair.

Variants: Peden, Patton, Padden, Padon, Patten