Camilla

f184a48379bffd61ab4494cdd10cd1b6
Pinterest-baby Camilla and her father

Origin: Latin, Etruscan

Meaning: feminine form of Latin Camillus, a term referring to an acolyte, a youth employed in rituals and sacrifice of ancient Roman religion.

Camilla is also the name of a warrior in the Aenead, whose name likely comes from Etruscan origin of unknown meaning. In the Aenead, Camilla was a member of the Volsci and daughter of King Metabus and his wife Casmilla (of whom she was likely named after). When Metabus was overthrown he fled with his infant daughter. When he got to the river Amasenus he tied baby Camilla to a spear, prayed to the goddess Diana (Artemis’s Greek counterpart) and promised her his daughter’s servitude and virginity if she made it safely across, which she did. When Camilla grew up she was a great warrior, and so swift she could run across water without getting her feet wet. She also sided against Aeneas and the Trojans but was killed in battle.

Variants: Camille (French, unisex); Kamilla, Kamila, Camillus (Ancient Roman), Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s