Eve

Origin: English, Hebrew

חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew) Chawwah

Meaning: from Hebrew Chawwah meaning “to breathe” or “to live”.

Eve is also an English word referring to evening, or the day before a date or event.

Evie/Evy is a dimunutive form of the name.

Variants: Eva, Ava; Chawwah (Hebrew); Hawa (Arabic)

Gilead

Origin: Hebrew

גִּלְעָד (Ancient Hebrew) Gil’ad

Meaning: the name of a place in the Old Testament, located east of Jordan, I’ve seen it meaning “monument of testimony”; “harsh”, rude” from Arabic jal’ad; “perptual fountain”, “heap of stones” or “camel hump”.

Variants: Gilad

It’s pronounced gil-ee-uhd and I’ve posted a link below.

http://forvo.com/search/gilead/

Sorin

Origin: Romanian, French, Jewish, Russian, Japanese

Meaning: possibly from Romanian soare meaning “sun”.

I’ve also seen it as a surname. It could be French in origin, from Old French sor, a diminutive of Sorel, meaning “chestnut”, originally a nickname for someone with reddish hair.

It also has a different etymology, a Jewish surname derived from a metronymic of Yiddish female personal given  name Sore, from Hebrew name Sara meaning “princess”, with the Slavic suffic -in. From what I could find, it seems to be (or used to be) very popular in Russia, especially Belarus.

Sōrin (宗 麟)also seems to be a Japanese masculine given name, such as Ōtomo Sōrin (who also went by other names), who was a daimyo of the Ōtomo clan in the 16th century (1530-1587). I couldn’t find any meaning on his name, though sōrin is also the vertical shaft on top of a Japanese pagoda, usually made out of bronze or stone. It means “alternate rings” with the kanji used (相 輪).

Sorinel is a pet form of the name.

Sorina is the feminine form of the name.

Amaris

Origin: Hebrew, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Latin

Meaning: a Hebrew feminine form of Amariah meaning “Yahweh has said” or “Yahweh has promised”.

I’ve also seen it listed as an elaborated form of Amaro, an Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese name and surname of various meanings. Amaro could be from Germanic name Amalric meaning “work, labor/power”. In Sicily, Amaro came about from a nickname meaning “bitter”, “unlucky” or “disappointed”; it could also be derived from Arabic name ‘Ammar meaning “virtuous, devout”.

Amaro is also a Portuguese name of unknown meaning, perhaps influenced from Latin amor meaning “love”. There’s a Saint Amaro in Christian tradition.

Amaris could also be a contracted form of Amaryllis, the Spanish form of Greek Amarilis meaning “to sparkle”.

 

Moran

Origin: Hebrew, Irish, Spanish

מוֹרָן (Hebrew)

Meaning: a unisex Hebrew name meaning “viburnum shrub”.

It’s also an Anglicized form of Irish surnames O’Morain and O’Moghrain meaning “descendant of Móran”, Móran being a diminutive of Mór meaning “large” or “great”.

Moran is also a Spanish surname, a habitational surname denoting those who came from a town called Morán.

Hanan

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic, Irish

חָנָן (Ancient Hebrew)- Chanan

حنان (Arabic)- Hanan

Meaning: a masculine Hebrew name meaning “gracious”; there are several minor figures in the Bible with the name.

It’s also a feminine Arabic name meaning “mercy, compassion”.

Hanan could also be a variant spelling of Irish Hannan from a Gaelic surname of unknown meaning.

Ephraim

Origin: Hebrew

אֶפְרָיִם (‘Efrayim)

Εφραιμ (Greek)

Meaning: from Hebrew ‘Efrayim meaning “fruitful”. However, I’ve also seen it listed as either being derived from Hebrew masculine noun ‘aper (אפר) meaning “covering” or “bandage” or from masculine noun ‘eper (אפר) meaning “ashes”.

Variants: Efraim; Evron (Yiddish)

Rami

Origin: Arabic, Hebrew, Indian

رامي (Arabic)

רמי (Hebrew)

Meaning: in Arabic it either comes from the verb rami (رامي) meaning “to throw” referring to either an archer or a good marksman; or it could be from ram (رام) meaning “to wish, to aim at, to dream, to be ambitious”.

Rami is also from Hebrew Ram (רָם) meaning “high, exalted” as well as being a short form of either Rahamim, which could mean “compassionate” or “affectionate” or Yermiyahu, the Hebrew form of Jeremiah meaning “Yahhew has uplifted”.

Rami is also a surname, both in Arabic and in Indian, the latter deriving from Rama meaning “pleasing” or “charming”.

Shiva

Origin: Indian, Persian

शिव (Hindi, Sanskrit)

شیوا (Persian)

שבעה (Hebrew)

Meaning: a masculine Sanskrit name meaning “benign, kind, auspicious”. It’s also a feminine Persian name meaning “charming, elegant”.

In Hindu mythology, Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and renewal, the husband of the goddess Parvati.

Variants: Siva (Hini, male).

In Judaism, Shiva is a week long mourning period also referred to as “sitting shiva”; shiva means “seven” in Hebrew, though I don’t know if it’s used as a name.

Bathsheba

Origin: Hebrew

בַּת־שֶׁבַע (Hebrew)

Meaning: “daughter of the oath” or, alternatively, “daughter of seven” since the last part of the name (sheba) is similar to both the word for oath and seven. For a more detailed etymology of the name, I posted the link below.

Variants: Bat-Sheva, Batsheva

Sheba could be a short form of Bathsheba which, by itself, could mean either “oath” or “seven” but from what I found out, Sheba is also used as a male  name several times in the Bible (with a different meaning) as well as a place name.

In the Old Testament, Bathsheba’s husband is intentionally sent to the frontline of battle to be killed so that King David could marry her. They have a son, Solomon.

Links:

http://www.abarim-publications.com/Meaning/Bathsheba.html#.V1eqileVfwx

Gabriel

Origin: Hebrew

גַּבְרִיאֵל (Gavri’el) Hebrew

Γαβριηλ (Gabriel) Ancient Greek

Meaning: from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man”, “strong man of God”, “God is my strength”.

Gabe is a diminutive form of the name.

Gabrielle and Gabriela/Gabriella are feminine forms of the name.

Masculine forms: Gabriele (Italian); Gábor (Hungarian); Gavriil (Russian); Jabril, Jibril (Arabic); Kaapro (Finnish).

Makeda

Origin: Ethiopic, Hebrew

Meaning: This is a name that has quite a few possible meanings but nothing quite concrete. It’s the Ethiopian name given to the Queen of Sheba which might mean “greatness”, “beautiful”, or derived from the Semitic word for “queen”.

It could also come from a Biblical Canaanite town called Makkedah which means “place of shepherds”.

I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “not thus” in Ethiopic due to a story that when she became queen she announced that it was “not thus is it good to worship the sun, but it is right to worship God”, moving the religion of the time from animism to monotheism.

The Queen of Sheba is a fascinating woman in history so I posted up a few links below for anyone who might be interested in knowing more.

Links:

http://www.dacb.org/stories/ethiopia/makeda.html

http://www.cafleurebon.com/makeda-is-the-true-name-of-the-ethiopian-queen-the-wife-of-king-solomon-of-judea/

http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/biblepeople/a/60113-Makeda-Sheba-Szczepanski.htm

Amos

Origin: Hebrew

עָמוֹס (Hebrew); Αμως (Ancient Greek)

Meaning: carried (by God).

Amos is one of twleve minor prophets in the Old Testament, who wrote the Book of Amos.

As a surname it seems to have a different origin, coming from Old French Amis meaning “friend” from Latin amicus, a derivative of amare “to love”.

There’s also an ancient city in Turkey called Amos. From what I could find, it comes from Greek, possibly meaning “sandy”.

Ishmael

Origin: Hebrew

Meaning: “God has heard” or “God will hear”

Ishmael is a character in the last book in A Series of Unfortunate Events (The End), a character who lives on the Island the Baudelaires and Count Olaf end up at, and is a stickler for customs and traditions on the Island.

Ishamel is also a character in Moby Dick and Daniel Quinn’s Ishmael.

Variants: Isma’il (Arabic), Ismael, Ismail

Ahab

Origin: Hebrew  ( אַחְאָב )

Meaning: from Hebrew אָח (‘ach) meaning “brother” and אֲב (‘av) “father” meaning “brother of the father” or “uncle”

The name is from the fourth book of A Series of Unfortunate Events (The Miserable Mill), the name of a hospital mentioned only once. There were very few A names I could find in the series, and those I did find I had already written about in previous posts.