Vidya

Origin: Indian

विद्या (Hindi, Sanskrit)

Meaning: it means “knowledge, science, learning” in Sanskrit. It was also one of the epithets of the Hindu goddess Saraswati.

Also it’s listed as a feminine name on Behind the name, I’ve seen it used as a masculine name, making it a unisex name.

Variants: Widya (Indonesian); Vidyā, Vidhya

Karya

Origin: Greek, Hindu

Meaning: nut tree

In Greek mythology, Karya is one of the Hamadryades, eight nymphs who presided over a particular tree. Karya is the nymph of the nut tree- walnut, hazel and the sweet chestnut.

There’s also another myth in which Karya was a Lakonian maiden who was loved by the god Dionysos. Her two sisters tried to prevent the liaison and in return, Dionysos drove them mad and they were later transformed into stone. Somehow Karya died and was changed into a nut tree.

Karya is also a word/concept in Hindi, referring to something (an action  whether good or bad) that is done.

Kārya is also a concept in Vedanta, a Hindu philosophy, which stands for effect (kārana is cause)..

Variants: Carya

Rami

Origin: Arabic, Hebrew, Indian

رامي (Arabic)

רמי (Hebrew)

Meaning: in Arabic it either comes from the verb rami (رامي) meaning “to throw” referring to either an archer or a good marksman; or it could be from ram (رام) meaning “to wish, to aim at, to dream, to be ambitious”.

Rami is also from Hebrew Ram (רָם) meaning “high, exalted” as well as being a short form of either Rahamim, which could mean “compassionate” or “affectionate” or Yermiyahu, the Hebrew form of Jeremiah meaning “Yahhew has uplifted”.

Rami is also a surname, both in Arabic and in Indian, the latter deriving from Rama meaning “pleasing” or “charming”.

Ida

Origin: Germanic, Greek, Old Norse, Irish, Hindu, Japanese

Meaning: a multicultural name with many meanings, Ida is from the Germanic element id meaning “work, labor”.

It’s also a Greek feminine name, the name of a mountain on the island of Crete, the birthplace of the Greek god Zeus, as well as being the name of the nymph who nursed him as a baby, along with another nymph, Adrasteia. The Greek meaning is unknown though I have seen it possibly coming from Greek idê and ida meaning “woodland”.

I’ve also seen Ida listed as being a variant of Iðunn, an Old Norse goddess from Old Norse  (again) and unna (to love).

It also seems to be an Anglicization of Irish Íde possibly meaning “thirst”.

Ida is also a name found in Hindu myth, a variant of Ila, a god or goddess who seemed to change gender frequently.

Ida is also a Japanese surname though I couldn’t find any meaning on it.

Shiva

Origin: Indian, Persian

शिव (Hindi, Sanskrit)

شیوا (Persian)

שבעה (Hebrew)

Meaning: a masculine Sanskrit name meaning “benign, kind, auspicious”. It’s also a feminine Persian name meaning “charming, elegant”.

In Hindu mythology, Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and renewal, the husband of the goddess Parvati.

Variants: Siva (Hini, male).

In Judaism, Shiva is a week long mourning period also referred to as “sitting shiva”; shiva means “seven” in Hebrew, though I don’t know if it’s used as a name.

Chandra

Origin: Indian

चण्ड (masculine form of Chandra)

चण्डा (feminine form of Chandra)

Meaning: derived from Sanskirt chand ( चन्द ) meaning “to shine” or “shining”, ultimately meaning “moon”

Chandra is the Hindu god of the moon. He is depicted as young and beautiful, a two armed god with a club and a lotus, who rides his chariot across the sky every night pulled by ten white horses. He also came to be merged with the Vedic god Soma (a name I already profiled earlier), both of whom are moon deities.

While Chandra is a unisex name, Chander is a purely masculine form of the name.

Soma

Origin: Hungarian, Indian, Greek, Japanese

Meaning: from Hungarian som meaning “dogwood, cornel tree”

Soma is also the name of a plant (and a Hindu god) from which an intoxicating drink is used from that plant for an ancient Vedic ritual. Soma is also the name of a Rigvedic god who somehow became merged or equated with the Hindu god Chandra since they were both moon deities.

As a drink, Soma is like ambrosia to the gods and for humans who drink it, it causes warriors to become fearless in battle and inspired poets to create-probably why the god Soma is seen as the god of poets. Interesingly enough, he’s rarely depicted as a full-grown human among his many forms, which include: a celestial bull, a bird, a giant rising from the waters, the lord of plants, and an embryo.

The Sanskrit Soma is believed to be derived from Proto-Indo-Iranian sauma, from the root of Indo-Iranian sav meaning “to press” or “to take liquid”

Sōma (σῶμα) is also a Greek word meaning “body”.

Sōma (also Sohma or Soma) is a Japanese surname (as well as the name of a clan durng the 16th century). It’s also the name of several places in Japan.I found three possible  forms of the name from Wikipedia although I couldn’t find any English translations for them:

相馬

操真

草摩.

Milan

Origin: Slavic

Милан (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Meaning: from Slavic element milu meaning :gracious, dear”. According to Wikipedia, it also has Indian and Latin origins; in Hindu it’s supposed to mean “eager”, “worthy”, or “competitor”, all coming from an expression meaning “a coming together”. In Latin, it’s supposed to mean “eager and laborious”

In Slavic-speaking countries, Milan is strictly a male name with Milana or Milena as its feminine counterparts, although it’s also been used for girls, probably inspired by the city in Italy (whose name comes from a different source- either from Latin or Celtic roots)