August

Origin: Latin

Meaning: a form of Augustus, from Latin meaning “great” or “venerable”. It was originally a title given to the first Roman emperor.

Gus and Augie are diminutives of the name.

Augusta and Augustine are feminine forms of the name, while Auguste is a unisex name (feminine in German, masculine in French) as well as Augustine.

Variants: Augusto (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish); Augustus (Latin); Aukusti (Finnish); Augustas, Augusts (Lithuanian); Avgust (Ukrainian, Russian).

Amaris

Origin: Hebrew, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Latin

Meaning: a Hebrew feminine form of Amariah meaning “Yahweh has said” or “Yahweh has promised”.

I’ve also seen it listed as an elaborated form of Amaro, an Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese name and surname of various meanings. Amaro could be from Germanic name Amalric meaning “work, labor/power”. In Sicily, Amaro came about from a nickname meaning “bitter”, “unlucky” or “disappointed”; it could also be derived from Arabic name ‘Ammar meaning “virtuous, devout”.

Amaro is also a Portuguese name of unknown meaning, perhaps influenced from Latin amor meaning “love”. There’s a Saint Amaro in Christian tradition.

Amaris could also be a contracted form of Amaryllis, the Spanish form of Greek Amarilis meaning “to sparkle”.

 

Peregrine

Origin: Latin

Meaning: from Latin Peregrinus meaning “traveler, stranger” or “pilgrim”, the latter referring to those who went on pilgramages.

Peregrina is the strictly feminine form of the name.

Peregrine is also the name of the Peregrine falcon.

Variants: Peregrinus, Pellegrino (Italian), Peregrin, Peregrina (f)

Titus

Origin: Ancient Roman

Meaning: a Roman praenomen possibly related to Latin titulus meaning “title of honor” or titio “fire-brand”, though it’s more likely of pre-Roman origin since it belonged to a Sabine king, Titus Tatius, who co-ruled with Romulus for some years.

Variants: Tita and Titia are feminine forms of the name.

Pavo

Origin: Croatian, Latin

Meaning: a short form of masculine name Pavao, the Croatian form of Paul meaning “small” or “humble”.

Pavo is also Latin for “peacock”, which is what makes it a unisex name in my opinion. Pavo is also the name of a constellation.

Sage

Origin: English, Old French, Latin

Meaning: an English word meaning “wise” or “sagacious”. As an English surname it was used as a nickname for a wise person from Old French sage meaning “learned, sensible”, ultimately from Latin sapiere “to taste, discern”.

It’s also from Latin salvere meaning “to feel well, wealthy”, the name of a genus of plants.

Calix

Origin: Latin

Meaning: a short form of Calixtus from Roman Callistus, the Greek form of Kallistos meaning “most beautiful”. The Callistus spelling was perhaps influenced by Latin calix meaning “wine cup”.

Calix is also a Catalan and Portuguese surname, perhaps deriving from Portugeuse cálice or Catalan càlic both meaning “communion cup”. In Catalan it could perhaps be derived from calitx, a type of throwing game.

Variants: Calixtus, Callistus

Ovidia

Origin: Latin, Romanian

Meaning: a feminine form of Ovid, the English form of Latin Ovidius either from Latin ovum meaning “egg” or Latin ovis “sheep”.

It’s also a Romanian feminine form of Ovidiu, the Romanian form of Ovid.

I’ve also seen it listed as a Norwegian feminine form of Ove which has several meanings: “inheritance”; “active, at work”.

Variants: Ovidio (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish); Ovidiu (Romanian); Ofydd (Welsh)

Pax

 

Origin: Latin, English

Meaning: it means “peace” in Latin, the name of the Roman goddess of peace in Roman mythology.

It could also be a variant spelling of an English surname, Packs or Pachs referring to a place name Pacca, as well as from Old French pasques meaning “Easter”. Pax is also an English word  meaning peace.

April

Origin: Latin

Meaning: originally the second month in the ancient Roman calendar, April comes from the adjective aperire “to open” in reference to when the trees and flowers begin to open up.

Aprilia is an elaborate form of the name

This isn’t part of the A-Z challenge but I’ve been doing a profile on each month and I didn’t want April to slip through.

Tatiana

Origin: Latin

Meaning: the feminine form of Tatianus, a derivative of Tatius, of unknown meaning.

Tatiana is a name mentioned once in Book 4 (The Miserable Mill), as a friend of the author Lemony Snicket.

Tanya/Tania is a short form of the name.

Variants: Tatyana (Russian); Tatjana (Finnish, German), Tatianna, Tatyanna (English); Tatianus (m); Tatienne (French)

Remora

Origin: Latin

Meaning: from Latin remora meaning “delay”. It’s a genus of fish, also known as suckerfish, because they attach themselves to other fish and boats. The remora actually got their name in the belief that their attaching themselves to the boats slowed them down.

Mr. Remora is a teacher in Book 5 (The Austere Academy) who loved eating bananas, had a tendency of telling tedious stories, and expected his students to remember all the details.

Luciana

Origin: Latin

Meaning: a feminine form of Latin Lucianus, from Roman praenomen Lucius meaning “light”.

Variants: Luciano (m), Lucianus (m)

Luciana is an alias Esmé Squalor uses in the 7th book (The Vile Village).

Luciana can be pronounced as loo-CHAH-nah, loo-SYAH-nah, or loo-THYAH-nah.

Camilla

Origin: Latin, Etruscan

Meaning: feminine form of Latin Camillus, a term referring to an acolyte, a youth employed in rituals and sacrifice of ancient Roman religion.

Camilla is also the name of a warrior in the Aenead, whose name likely comes from Etruscan origin of unknown meaning. In the Aenead, Camilla was a member of the Volsci and daughter of King Metabus and his wife Casmilla (of whom she was likely named after). When Metabus was overthrown he fled with his infant daughter. When he got to the river Amasenus he tied baby Camilla to a spear, prayed to the goddess Diana (Artemis’s Greek counterpart) and promised her his daughter’s servitude and virginity if she made it safely across, which she did. When Camilla grew up she was a great warrior, and so swift she could run across water without getting her feet wet. She also sided against Aeneas and the Trojans but was killed in battle.

Variants: Camille (French, unisex); Kamilla, Kamila, Camillus (Ancient Roman), Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)