Eldrid

Origin: Norwegian, English

Meaning: from Old Norse Eldríðr meaning “fire beautiful” or “beautiful fire” from elements eldr “fire” and fríðr “beautiful”.

It could also come from Old English Æðelþryð meaning “noble strength” from English elements Æðel “noble” and þryð “strength”. It could also be the Old Norse orm of Eldrit, the Frankish form of masculine Hildifrid meaning “battle,fight/peace, friendship” from elements hild “battle, fight” and frid “peace, friendship”.

Eldrid could also be a variant spelling of masculine Eldred meaning “old counsel”.

Variants: Eldríðr (f, Old Norse); Eldred (m, English)

Gabriel

Origin: Hebrew

גַּבְרִיאֵל (Gavri’el) Hebrew

Γαβριηλ (Gabriel) Ancient Greek

Meaning: from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man”, “strong man of God”, “God is my strength”.

Gabe is a diminutive form of the name.

Gabrielle and Gabriela/Gabriella are feminine forms of the name.

Masculine forms: Gabriele (Italian); Gábor (Hungarian); Gavriil (Russian); Jabril, Jibril (Arabic); Kaapro (Finnish).

Ovidia

Origin: Latin, Romanian

Meaning: a feminine form of Ovid, the English form of Latin Ovidius either from Latin ovum meaning “egg” or Latin ovis “sheep”.

It’s also a Romanian feminine form of Ovidiu, the Romanian form of Ovid.

I’ve also seen it listed as a Norwegian feminine form of Ove which has several meanings: “inheritance”; “active, at work”.

Variants: Ovidio (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish); Ovidiu (Romanian); Ofydd (Welsh)

Tatiana

Origin: Latin

Meaning: the feminine form of Tatianus, a derivative of Tatius, of unknown meaning.

Tatiana is a name mentioned once in Book 4 (The Miserable Mill), as a friend of the author Lemony Snicket.

Tanya/Tania is a short form of the name.

Variants: Tatyana (Russian); Tatjana (Finnish, German), Tatianna, Tatyanna (English); Tatianus (m); Tatienne (French)

Olaf

Origin: Old Norse

Meaning: from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” or “ancestor’s relics” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor, father) and leifr (descendant, heir, heritage).

Variants: Olav (Norwegian, Danish); Oluf (Danish).

Count Olaf is the main antagonist of the series, relentlessly pursuing the Baudelaire children for their fortune.

Klaus

Origin: German

Meaning: German short form of Nicholas, meaning “victory of the people”

Pronounced KLOWS, Klaus Baudelaire is the middle child and only brother. He’s a voracious reader and remembers nearly everything he’s ever read, which has helped him and his sisters out of a few tight spots.

Runa

Origin: Old Norse, Japanese

Meaning: feminine form of Rune meaning “secret, lore”, which comes from Old Norse Rúni which comes from Norse element run.

I’ve also found the name listed as a Japanese female name, as well as a Bengali name, though I couldn’t find any meanings for them. The closest I could find a meaning was that maybe it’s a transliteration of Luna (moon) in Japanese since there seems to be some difficulty with the L/R pronouncation- but that’s all purely conjecture on my part.

According to http://nookofnames.com/2011/09/22/incan-inspiration/ , Runa is also a Quechuan word meaning “man, adult, mankind”

Marcus, Markus

Origin: German, Scandinavian, Finnish, Ancient Roman, Norwegian, English, Swedish, Danish

Meaning: Markus is the German, Scandinavian, and Finnish form of Mark, whichs comes from the Roman praenomen Marcus probably derived from Mars, which might come from Latin mas  meaning “male” (Behind the name). According to nameberry, it means “warlike”- probably because Mars was the Roman counterpart of Greek Ares, both gods of war within their cultures.

Variants: Marcus, Marc, Mark

Helena

Origin: Greek, Latin

Meaning: Latin form of Helen, which comes from Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, or possibly related to selene meaning “moon”

‘Ελενη (Greek)

Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Eva

Origin: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Biblical

Meaning: form of Eve, meaning to breathe or to live

Karen

Origin: Danish, Norwegian, German, English, Armenian

Meaning: it’s a Danish form of Katherine which could mean “pure, chaste” from the Greek katharos; or it could come from hekateros, “each of the two; singly”; or from Greek aikia meaning “torture”. It could also be a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. It’s also a masculine Armenian transcription of Garen, which itself is a short form of Garegin, its meaning unknown