Sorin

Origin: Romanian, French, Jewish, Russian, Japanese

Meaning: possibly from Romanian soare meaning “sun”.

I’ve also seen it as a surname. It could be French in origin, from Old French sor, a diminutive of Sorel, meaning “chestnut”, originally a nickname for someone with reddish hair.

It also has a different etymology, a Jewish surname derived from a metronymic of Yiddish female personal given  name Sore, from Hebrew name Sara meaning “princess”, with the Slavic suffic -in. From what I could find, it seems to be (or used to be) very popular in Russia, especially Belarus.

Sōrin (宗 麟)also seems to be a Japanese masculine given name, such as Ōtomo Sōrin (who also went by other names), who was a daimyo of the Ōtomo clan in the 16th century (1530-1587). I couldn’t find any meaning on his name, though sōrin is also the vertical shaft on top of a Japanese pagoda, usually made out of bronze or stone. It means “alternate rings” with the kanji used (相 輪).

Sorinel is a pet form of the name.

Sorina is the feminine form of the name.

Malina

Origin: Scottish, Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Greek, Inuit

Meaning: a diminutive of Scottish Malcolmina, the feminine form of Malcolm meaning “disciple of Saint Columba”.

Malina is also a Slavic name meaning “raspberry”.

Mălina is also a Romanian name, deriving from the Romanian word mălin meaning “bird cherry tree”.

It could also be an elaborate form of Scandanivian Malin, a short form of Magdalene meaning “of Magdala”. It could also be derived from Hebrew migdal meaning “tower” from a root meaning “high”.

Malina could also be a variant spelling of Greek Melina meaning “honey”.

Malina is also a figure in Inuit mythology (the practices and spiritual beliefs of the Inuit, an indigenous people from Alaska, Canada, and Greenland). Malina was a sun goddess and her brother Anningan is the moon god. Legend has it that the two got into an argument, she spread black grease on his face, and ran away eventually becoming the sun goddess ( there’s a darker version of the story in which Anningan rapes his sister and she ran away to get away from him). Anningan chases after her, becoming the moon god. So intent is he on chasing after Malina that he forgets to eat and starves, becoming thinner and thinner until he disappears to eat. It’s said that when he finally catches up with her it causes a solar eclipse.

Gabriel

Origin: Hebrew

גַּבְרִיאֵל (Gavri’el) Hebrew

Γαβριηλ (Gabriel) Ancient Greek

Meaning: from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man”, “strong man of God”, “God is my strength”.

Gabe is a diminutive form of the name.

Gabrielle and Gabriela/Gabriella are feminine forms of the name.

Masculine forms: Gabriele (Italian); Gábor (Hungarian); Gavriil (Russian); Jabril, Jibril (Arabic); Kaapro (Finnish).

Ovidia

Origin: Latin, Romanian

Meaning: a feminine form of Ovid, the English form of Latin Ovidius either from Latin ovum meaning “egg” or Latin ovis “sheep”.

It’s also a Romanian feminine form of Ovidiu, the Romanian form of Ovid.

I’ve also seen it listed as a Norwegian feminine form of Ove which has several meanings: “inheritance”; “active, at work”.

Variants: Ovidio (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish); Ovidiu (Romanian); Ofydd (Welsh)

Tatiana

Origin: Latin

Meaning: the feminine form of Tatianus, a derivative of Tatius, of unknown meaning.

Tatiana is a name mentioned once in Book 4 (The Miserable Mill), as a friend of the author Lemony Snicket.

Tanya/Tania is a short form of the name.

Variants: Tatyana (Russian); Tatjana (Finnish, German), Tatianna, Tatyanna (English); Tatianus (m); Tatienne (French)

Fane

Origin: English, Romanian, Irish

Meaning: In English, fane is a word name, an archaic term for a temple or a church or a shrine (according to Dictionary.com); it could also mean “joyful, glad”; in Romanian, it’s also a diminutive of Ștefan, meaning “crown”; and it’s also the name of a river in Ireland, but I couldn’t find any meaning for it in Irish.

Variants: Fayne