Simona

Origin: Italian, English Meaning: Simona is the feminine form of Italian masculine Simone; it's also the feminine form of Simon as well meaning "he has heard" or "God is listening". Simonetta is the Italian diminutive of Simona Simone (u)

Malina

Origin: Scottish, Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Greek, Inuit Meaning: a diminutive of Scottish Malcolmina, the feminine form of Malcolm meaning "disciple of Saint Columba". Malina is also a Slavic name meaning "raspberry". Mălina is also a Romanian name, deriving from the Romanian word mălin meaning "bird cherry tree". It could also be an … Continue reading Malina

Gabriel

Origin: Hebrew גַּבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) Hebrew Γαβριηλ (Gabriel) Ancient Greek Meaning: from Hebrew Gavri'el meaning "God is my strong man", "strong man of God", "God is my strength". Gabe is a diminutive form of the name. Gabrielle and Gabriela/Gabriella are feminine forms of the name. Masculine forms: Gabriele (Italian); Gábor (Hungarian); Gavriil (Russian); Jabril, Jibril (Arabic); Kaapro … Continue reading Gabriel

Hana

Origin: Arabic, Japanese, Korean, Czech, Slovak, Croatian هناء (Arabic) 花 (Japanese) 華 (Japanese) 하나 (Korean) Meaning: Hana is multicultural name with many different meanings. In Arabic it means "bliss, happiness". In Persian, Farsi and Kurdish, spelled ( حَنا ) it becomes the name of the henna plant while Kurdish  ( هانا ) means "hope"- though the last … Continue reading Hana

Tatiana

Origin: Latin Meaning: the feminine form of Tatianus, a derivative of Tatius, of unknown meaning. Tatiana is a name mentioned once in Book 4 (The Miserable Mill), as a friend of the author Lemony Snicket. Tanya/Tania is a short form of the name. Variants: Tatyana (Russian); Tatjana (Finnish, German), Tatianna, Tatyanna (English); Tatianus (m); Tatienne … Continue reading Tatiana

Helena

Origin: Greek, Latin Meaning: Latin form of Helen, which comes from Greek helene meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to selene meaning "moon" ‘Ελενη (Greek) Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you're from. It's he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Vladimir, Vladimír

Origin: Slavic Владимир (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) Meaning: from Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and meru "great, famous" meaning "famous ruler". According to Behindthename, the second element could also be associated with miru "peace, world" so the meaning could also be "peaceful ruler" or "world ruler". The Vladimír spelling is the Czech and Slovak form of Vladimir.

Milan

Origin: Slavic Милан (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) Meaning: from Slavic element milu meaning :gracious, dear". According to Wikipedia, it also has Indian and Latin origins; in Hindu it's supposed to mean "eager", "worthy", or "competitor", all coming from an expression meaning "a coming together". In Latin, it's supposed to mean "eager and laborious" In Slavic-speaking countries, Milan … Continue reading Milan

Petra

Origin: Greek, Finnish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Meaning: feminine form of Peter, meaning "stone" or "rock" Variants: Peta, Petrina, Penka