Bay

Origin: English, Germanic, Gaelic/Scottish, Turkish

Meaning: from Latin baca meaning “berry”, originally referring to the berries of a bay tree.

As a surname it comes from Old English Beaga (m) and Beage (f) which mean “garland”, “crown” and “treasure thing”. Bay is also an English word referring to an area of water bordered by land on three sides, as well as referring to the color “reddish brown”.

It also seems to be a variant spelling of Turkish bey, a title used by wealthy leaders referring to a cheiftain or lord.

Bay is also a short form of Bayer, a German surname meaning “Bavaria”, referring to someone from there.

Bay could also be a short form of Gaelic surname O’Bae, itself a short form of McBeth/Macbeth meaning “son of life”, though it also seems to have an implicit meaning of “righteous man” or “religious man”.

Variants: Bae, Baye

August

Origin: Latin

Meaning: a form of Augustus, from Latin meaning “great” or “venerable”. It was originally a title given to the first Roman emperor.

Gus and Augie are diminutives of the name.

Augusta and Augustine are feminine forms of the name, while Auguste is a unisex name (feminine in German, masculine in French) as well as Augustine.

Variants: Augusto (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish); Augustus (Latin); Aukusti (Finnish); Augustas, Augusts (Lithuanian); Avgust (Ukrainian, Russian).

Manuel

Origin: Spanish, Portuguese, German

Meaning: the Spanish, Portuguese and German form of Emmanuel meaning “God is with us”.

Manuela is the feminine form of the name.

Manny is a common nickname in English; Manolo and Manu are the Spanish diminutives of the name while Nelinho is the Portuguese diminutive. Manu is also the short form of Manuel (as well as its feminine form Manuela) in German.

Variants: Manoel (Portuguese Brazilian); Manuele, Emanuele (Italian); Emanuel (German, Portuguese); Manouel (Late Greek); Emmanuel (Hebrew, English); Emmanuel (French).

Ida

Origin: Germanic, Greek, Old Norse, Irish, Hindu, Japanese

Meaning: a multicultural name with many meanings, Ida is from the Germanic element id meaning “work, labor”.

It’s also a Greek feminine name, the name of a mountain on the island of Crete, the birthplace of the Greek god Zeus, as well as being the name of the nymph who nursed him as a baby, along with another nymph, Adrasteia. The Greek meaning is unknown though I have seen it possibly coming from Greek idê and ida meaning “woodland”.

I’ve also seen Ida listed as being a variant of Iðunn, an Old Norse goddess from Old Norse  (again) and unna (to love).

It also seems to be an Anglicization of Irish Íde possibly meaning “thirst”.

Ida is also a name found in Hindu myth, a variant of Ila, a god or goddess who seemed to change gender frequently.

Ida is also a Japanese surname though I couldn’t find any meaning on it.

Roland

Origin: Germanic

Meaning: from Germanic elements hrod “fame” and land “land” meaning “famous land”.

Rolande is the French feminine form of the name, while Rolanda is also a feminine form of the name.

Variants: Rolland, Rowalnd, Orlando (Italian), Rolando (Italian, Spanish)

Gabriel

Origin: Hebrew

גַּבְרִיאֵל (Gavri’el) Hebrew

Γαβριηλ (Gabriel) Ancient Greek

Meaning: from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man”, “strong man of God”, “God is my strength”.

Gabe is a diminutive form of the name.

Gabrielle and Gabriela/Gabriella are feminine forms of the name.

Masculine forms: Gabriele (Italian); Gábor (Hungarian); Gavriil (Russian); Jabril, Jibril (Arabic); Kaapro (Finnish).

Tatiana

Origin: Latin

Meaning: the feminine form of Tatianus, a derivative of Tatius, of unknown meaning.

Tatiana is a name mentioned once in Book 4 (The Miserable Mill), as a friend of the author Lemony Snicket.

Tanya/Tania is a short form of the name.

Variants: Tatyana (Russian); Tatjana (Finnish, German), Tatianna, Tatyanna (English); Tatianus (m); Tatienne (French)

Olaf

Origin: Old Norse

Meaning: from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” or “ancestor’s relics” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor, father) and leifr (descendant, heir, heritage).

Variants: Olav (Norwegian, Danish); Oluf (Danish).

Count Olaf is the main antagonist of the series, relentlessly pursuing the Baudelaire children for their fortune.

Klaus

Origin: German

Meaning: German short form of Nicholas, meaning “victory of the people”

Pronounced KLOWS, Klaus Baudelaire is the middle child and only brother. He’s a voracious reader and remembers nearly everything he’s ever read, which has helped him and his sisters out of a few tight spots.

Josephine

Origin: French, English

Meaning: the French feminine form of Joseph from the Hebrew Yosef meaning “He will add” or “God shall add”.

Josephine Anwhistle is one of the guardians of the Baudelaires’ in the 3rd book (The Wide Window), a woman who loves grammar and was absolutely afraid of everything- doorknobs, stoves, and even realtors.

Variants: Joséphine (French); Josephina

Gunther

Origin: German

Meaning: from Germanic Gundahar meaning “war, army/warrior” from Germanic elements gund (war) and hari (army, warrior)

In the Germanic saga Nibelungenlied Gunther is a king who wants to marry Brunhild, a shieldmaiden or valkyrie, but someone who is very strong and fierce. She sets a series os tasks for Gunther that are impossible for him to do, so his oath-brother (and later brother-in-law) Siegfried took his place with the aid of an invisible cloak, won the trials, and eventually Brünhild’s hand in marriage to Gunther (all without her knowing the truth for years to come). However, in the end, Gunther ends up betraying Siegfried, having him killed, and later he himself meets a violent end.

In A Series of Unfortunate Events Book 6 (The Ersatz Elevator) Gunther is one of the aliases Count Olaf uses when he tries to get close to the Baudelaires and their new guardians.

Variants: Günther, Gunter, Günter

Bellicent

Origin: French, German, English

Meaning: Possibly an Old French form of Germanic Belissendis, possibly composed of elements bili meaning “suitable, proper, fitting, decent, amiable” and swind “strong, brave, powerful”

It could also be another form of Elizabeth meaning “My God is oath” or “My God is abundance”

It could also be related to Belenus, a Celtic god of the sun, whose name means “bright, brilliant”

Bellicent is also used in Alfred Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King” in which Bellicent is the half-sister of Arthur and mother of Gareth, Gawain, Mordred, Gaheris and Agravain

Variants: Belisant, Belsante, Belissant, Belisend, Belisenda

Links:

http://www.britishbabynames.com/blog/2012/07/belisent.html

http://www.behindthename.com/name/bellicent/submitted

http://bewitchingnames.blogspot.com/2011/09/bellicent.html

http://appellationmountain.net/belsante-baby-name-of-the-day/