Gilgamesh

Origin: Akkadian, Sumerian

Meaning: though the meaning is not clear, I’ve seen it listed as meaning something to the effect of “the ancestor is a young man” or “may the (mature) man become a young man again”.

Variants: Bilgamesh (Sumerian); Gilgamos (Greek)

The eponymous hero of the Epic of Gilgamesh, an epic poem believed to be the oldest surviving work of Western literature; it’s believed that he was based on a real historical figure.

Karya

Origin: Greek, Hindu

Meaning: nut tree

In Greek mythology, Karya is one of the Hamadryades, eight nymphs who presided over a particular tree. Karya is the nymph of the nut tree- walnut, hazel and the sweet chestnut.

There’s also another myth in which Karya was a Lakonian maiden who was loved by the god Dionysos. Her two sisters tried to prevent the liaison and in return, Dionysos drove them mad and they were later transformed into stone. Somehow Karya died and was changed into a nut tree.

Karya is also a word/concept in Hindi, referring to something (an action  whether good or bad) that is done.

Kārya is also a concept in Vedanta, a Hindu philosophy, which stands for effect (kārana is cause)..

Variants: Carya

Aras

Origin: Lithuanian, Kurdish, Persian, Greek

Meaning: a Lithuanian masculine name meaning “eagle”.

I’ve also seen it listed as a Kurdish and Persian name meaning “equal” or “balanced”.

Aras is also the name of a Greek figure in Greek mythology, believed to have built an ancient town in Pgilasia, Peloponnese. I couldn’t find any info on the name’s meaning, however.

Lada

Origin: Slavic; Georgian

Meaning: it could mean “young girl” from Slavic mlada, or “bride” or “girl, maid”; the etymology is not clear.

I’ve also seen the name listed as the feminine form of Lado, a Georgian masculine short form of Vladimer from Russian Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “peaceful ruler”.

In Slavic mythology, Lada (also known as Lado) is the goddess of love, beauty and marriage, often associated with the other goddesses Freya, Isis and Aphrodite. She’s depicted as a young woman with long golden hair with ears of grain braided in it to represent fertility. Lada is also associated with the summer season and her animals are a cock, a deer, an ant and an eagle, and plants associated with her are a cherry, a dandelion, a linden, and a peony.

However, since Slavic mythology had not been written down in the past, much of the folklore was lost and it’s believed that Lada had never existed in the first place but had been created out of the mistaken belief that the terms used in folk songs (Lada & Lado) were referring to a god/goddess.

Perimede

Origin: Greek

Meaning: from Greek peri meaning “around”, “exceedingly” and medos  meaning “plans” or “schemes” ultinateky meaning “surrounded by schemes” or “around schemes”.

Perimede is the name of several minor figures in Greek mythology, as well as another name for Agamede, a witch mentioned in the Iliad as someone who knew the healing powers of every plant in the world.

The name is pronounced pe-ree-MEED-ee

Agamede

Origin: Greek

Αγαμηδη (Greek)

Meaning: composed of Greek elements aga meaning “greatly, strongly” and medos meaning “plans”, “schemes”, and “counsels”, generally interpreted to mean “very skilled” or “very cunning”.

Agamede was mentioned in passing in Homer’s Iliad, said to know the healing powers of every plant in the world. She was later associated as more of a sorceress-like figure (like Circe and Medea).

In Greek mythology, she was the mother of Dictys by the god Poseidon.

Agamede was also known as Perimede.

It’s pronounced as a-ga-MEE-dee

Eucleia

Origin: Greek

Ευκλεια (Greek)

Meaning: “good glory” or “good repute” from Greek eu meaning “good” and kleos meaning  “glory”.

In Greek mythology, Eucleia was a daimona (spirit) of good repute and glory and, along with her sisters Eupheme (acclaim), Eutheia (prosperity), and Philophrosyne (welcome) were probably known as the younger Kharites (Graces).

In Greek vase paintings, Eucleia was often depicted among the attendants of Aphrodite, representing the good repute of a chaste bride.

Eucleia was also sometimes identified with Artemis.

Variants: Eukleia

Sohrab

Origin: Persian

سهراب (Persian) Sohrab

Meaning: it means either “illustrious, shining” or “red water”.

In the Persian epic of Shahnameh Sohrab is the name of the son of the hero Rostam. It’s rather a tragic story. Rostam is searching for his lost horse Rakhsh and enters the kingdom of Samangan, becoming the guest of the king whose daughter, Tahmina, falls in love with him at first sight. She visits him in the night wanting to have a child with him and they do spend the night together. Before Rostam leaves, he gives Tahmina two tokens and tells her that if she has a girl she should take one of the tokens, a jewel, and plait it in her hair. If it’s a boy, she should take the other token, a seal, and bind it around his arm. Years pass and Rostam and Sohrab face each other on opposites sides of a war, wrestling each other one on one. Rostam doesn’t know Sohrab is his son and although Sohrab knows the identity of his father, he doesn’t realize that the man he’s fighting is him. Eventually Rostam kills him by stabbing him through the heart, only then seeing the token he’d given Tahmina, who arrives at the battlefield too late to find her son dead in his father’s arms.

Variants: Suhrab; Zurab (Georgian); Sukhrab (Kazakh, Kyrgyz)

Tyro

Origin: Greek

Meaning: from Greek tyrôs meaning “cheese”

In Greek mythology, Tyro was a Thessalian princess who was in love with a river god, Enipeus, who refused her advances. Poseidon disguised himself as Enipeus and seduced Tyro, resulting in the birth of twin sons Pelias and Neleus, whom she left on a mountain to die of exposure though they were saved by a herdsman and raised as his own. Years down the line they came back and killed Tyro’s stepmother, Sidero, who had been mistreating her.

Tyro is also the mother of Aeson from her marriage to a mortal king, Cretheus, who later becomes the father of Jason of the Argo, making her his grandmother.

Tyro’s name was given to her because her complexion was fair as white goat’s cheese.

Brigid

Origin: Irish

Meaning: I’ve seen it listed as meaning “exalted one”, but also coming from Celtic brig/brigant meaning “high” or briga meaning “might” and “power”.

Variants: Brighid, Bridget, Bridgette, Bride, Brid, Breda; Brigitta, Brigitte, Birgitta, Britta, Brigida

In Irish mythology, Brigid is one of the triple goddess and ruled over healing, poetry and smithcraft.

Perun

Origin: Slavic

Meaning: “thunder”. I’ve also seen it listed as coming from an Indo-European root word parg meaning “to strike, to slay”, or perhaps coming from another Proto-Indo-European root word perku “oak”.

In Slavic mythology, Perun is the god of thunder and lightning and the highest god in the Slavic pantheon. He’s also associated with the oak tree.

Freyr

Origin: Old Norse

Meaning: lord

In Norse mythology, Freyr is the Norse god of fertility and the weather, and the husband of Gerd, a frost giantess, for whom he gave up a magical sword just to be with her though, without it, he will be killed during Ragnorak.

Freyr is also the twin brother of Freya, another Norse goddess.

Freya is the feminine form of the name, meaning “lady”.

Variants: Frey

Pandora

Origin: Greek

Πανδωρα (Greek)

Meaning: from Greek elements pan “all” and doron “gift” meaning “all gifted” or “all giving”.

In Greek mythology, Pandora was the first mortal woman created by the gods for the Titan Prometheus, who had stolen fire and given it to the humans. Displeased with this, Zeus and the other gods created Pandora, each giving her a particular gift such as beauty, cunning, needlework, etc., explaining the meaning of her name such since she’d been given a gift by the gods. Pandora is given a jar by Zeus and warned never to open it; her curioisty got the best of her and when she finally did open the jar she let out all the evils in the world, except for hope, which remained in the jar, although I’ve never understood that particular part of the myth. If hope remained in the jar, wouldn’t that mean it never got into the world?

Merlin

Origin: Welsh, English

Meaning: from Welsh Myrddin meaning “sea fortress”.

Meaning: Merlin is a key figure in the King Arthur romance, a sorcerer who is Arthur’s closest adviser and ally. The name was Latinized into Merlinus by Geoffrey of Monmouth because its regular form, Merdinus, was similar to the Anglo-Norman word merde that meant excrement.

Myrrdin Wyllt is a figure in Medieval Welsh legend, depicted as a madman after a battle in which his lord was killed, who went to live in the forest with the animals and received the gift of prophecy. Interestingly enough, this Myrrdin was the same person Geoffrey of Monmouth took and conflated with his character of Merlin .

Merlis is also the name of a species of falcon.

Variants: Merlin, Merlyn

Ida

Origin: Germanic, Greek, Old Norse, Irish, Hindu, Japanese

Meaning: a multicultural name with many meanings, Ida is from the Germanic element id meaning “work, labor”.

It’s also a Greek feminine name, the name of a mountain on the island of Crete, the birthplace of the Greek god Zeus, as well as being the name of the nymph who nursed him as a baby, along with another nymph, Adrasteia. The Greek meaning is unknown though I have seen it possibly coming from Greek idê and ida meaning “woodland”.

I’ve also seen Ida listed as being a variant of Iðunn, an Old Norse goddess from Old Norse  (again) and unna (to love).

It also seems to be an Anglicization of Irish Íde possibly meaning “thirst”.

Ida is also a name found in Hindu myth, a variant of Ila, a god or goddess who seemed to change gender frequently.

Ida is also a Japanese surname though I couldn’t find any meaning on it.

Bronte

Origin: Irish, Greek

Βροντη (Greek)

Meaning: an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Proinntigh meaning “descendant of Proinnteach”, the latter meaning “bestower”. Usually spelled Brontë.

Spelled Brontê, it’s the name of the Greek goddess of thunder whose name also means “thunder”, who along with her sister Astrapê the goddess of lightning (whose name also means lightning) were the handmaidens to Zeus.

Titan

Origin: Greek

Meaning: though there are different theories to the name’s meaning, it could be derived from Greek titainô meaning “to stretch out” and “to strain”.

Titan is also a word referring to something gigantic in size or power, something that stands out for greatness of achievement and from which the word titanic originates from. In Greek mythology, the Titans preceded the Olympian gods, giant deities who ruled during the Golden Age and were later overthrown by the Olympian gods.

Shiva

Origin: Indian, Persian

शिव (Hindi, Sanskrit)

شیوا (Persian)

שבעה (Hebrew)

Meaning: a masculine Sanskrit name meaning “benign, kind, auspicious”. It’s also a feminine Persian name meaning “charming, elegant”.

In Hindu mythology, Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and renewal, the husband of the goddess Parvati.

Variants: Siva (Hini, male).

In Judaism, Shiva is a week long mourning period also referred to as “sitting shiva”; shiva means “seven” in Hebrew, though I don’t know if it’s used as a name.

Larissa, Larisa

Origin: Greek

Лариса (Russian, Ukrainian) Larisa

Λαρισα (Ancient Greek) Larisa

Meaning: the name of an ancient city in Greece, the name most likely means “citadel” or “fortress”.

Larissa is a nymph in Greek mythology.

Lara is a short form of the name.

Variants: Larysa (Ukrainian); Larisa is the version often used in Russia.