Bay

Origin: English, Germanic, Gaelic/Scottish, Turkish

Meaning: from Latin baca meaning “berry”, originally referring to the berries of a bay tree.

As a surname it comes from Old English Beaga (m) and Beage (f) which mean “garland”, “crown” and “treasure thing”. Bay is also an English word referring to an area of water bordered by land on three sides, as well as referring to the color “reddish brown”.

It also seems to be a variant spelling of Turkish bey, a title used by wealthy leaders referring to a cheiftain or lord.

Bay is also a short form of Bayer, a German surname meaning “Bavaria”, referring to someone from there.

Bay could also be a short form of Gaelic surname O’Bae, itself a short form of McBeth/Macbeth meaning “son of life”, though it also seems to have an implicit meaning of “righteous man” or “religious man”.

Variants: Bae, Baye

Rainey

Origin: Gaelic, English

Meaning: from what I could find, it’s a Scottish or Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic O’Raighne meaning “descendent of Raonull”, the latter being either a form of Ronald which means “advice,counsel +power,ruler” or a form of Reynold meaning “advice+rule”.

It can also be a variant spelling of English rainy.

Variants: Rainy

Sterling

Origin: English, Scottish

Meaning: from an English surname from Old English sterre meaning “star” with the diminutive suffix -ling meaning “little star”, so named because some of the Norman coins it was named after had star emblems on them. Sterling could also be a variant of Starling, referring to the bird.

Sterling could also be a variant spelling of Stirling, a place in Scotland. Though the meaning isn’t clear, it could be related to stri “strife” and linne “pool”.

Sterling has entered English vocabulary as referring to something excellent (sterling silver) as well as being British currency (pound sterling).

Variants: Stirling

Malina

Origin: Scottish, Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Greek, Inuit

Meaning: a diminutive of Scottish Malcolmina, the feminine form of Malcolm meaning “disciple of Saint Columba”.

Malina is also a Slavic name meaning “raspberry”.

Mălina is also a Romanian name, deriving from the Romanian word mălin meaning “bird cherry tree”.

It could also be an elaborate form of Scandanivian Malin, a short form of Magdalene meaning “of Magdala”. It could also be derived from Hebrew migdal meaning “tower” from a root meaning “high”.

Malina could also be a variant spelling of Greek Melina meaning “honey”.

Malina is also a figure in Inuit mythology (the practices and spiritual beliefs of the Inuit, an indigenous people from Alaska, Canada, and Greenland). Malina was a sun goddess and her brother Anningan is the moon god. Legend has it that the two got into an argument, she spread black grease on his face, and ran away eventually becoming the sun goddess ( there’s a darker version of the story in which Anningan rapes his sister and she ran away to get away from him). Anningan chases after her, becoming the moon god. So intent is he on chasing after Malina that he forgets to eat and starves, becoming thinner and thinner until he disappears to eat. It’s said that when he finally catches up with her it causes a solar eclipse.

Esmé, Esmée

Origin: Old French

Meaning: “esteemed” or “beloved” from Old French Aimé. Apparently, Esmé was first recorded for Esmé Stuart, Duke of Lennox (1542-1583) in Scotland, whose parents’ had French ties.

Esmé Squalor is one of the guardians of the Baudelaire children in Book 6 (The Ersatz Elevator), who turns out to be one of the villains and girlfriend of Count Olaf.

Paden

Origin: Irish, Scottish, English

Meaning: I’ve seen it described as a modern invention using the popular aden suffix but it also has a long history as a surname as well. It could be an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Páidín meaning “son of Páidín”, Páidín being a pet form of Pádraig/Patrick (Patrician/nobleman).

It could also be a variant spelling of Patton, also a surname which is either a short form of Patrick + the diminutive suffix -in meaning “little Pat” or “son of Pat”; or it could be from Middle English pate meaning “head” or “skull” referring to someone who was either bald or had cropped hair.

Variants: Peden, Patton, Padden, Padon, Patten

Jean, Jeanne

Origin: French, Scottish, English

Meaning: Jean is the French masculine form of John (Yahweh is gracious) and Jeanne is the French feminine form of the name. Jean is also the Scottish form of Jane, which is the feminine form of John.

Jean and Jeanne are pronounced ZHAWN (or Jaune) in the French language while Jean in English tends to be jeen.

Links

http://forvo.com/search/jean/